Rape And Sexual Assault

The Demographics of Rape
According to the U.S. Department of Justice, an estimated 91% of the victims of rape and sexual assault are female and 9% are male.

Nearly 99% of the offenders they described in single-victim incidents are male.
Lawrence A. Greenfield. 1997. Sex Offenses and Offenders: An Analysis of Data on Rape and Sexual Assault. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice.

80%-90% of violent crimes against women are committed by someone of the same racial background as the victim.
US Department of Justice. 1994. Violence Against Women. Rockville, Maryland: Bureau of Justice Statistics, US Department of Justice.

Sexual Assault Prevalence
1.3 women (ages 18 and over) in the United States are forcibly raped each minute. That translates to 78 per hour, 1,871 per day, or 683,000 per year.
D.G. Kilpatrick, C.N. Edmunds, & A. Seymour. 1992. Rape in America: A Report to the Nation. Arlington VA: National Victim Center.

Overall Crime figures for the state of California from January to June 2000 show a 9.7% increase in the number of reported forcible rapes when compared to the same period in 1999.
Criminal Justice Statistics Center, December 2000.

Rape and sexual assault prevalence is difficult to determine because the crime is significantly underreported. The primary annual government indicators available are the FBI's Uniform Crime Report (UCR), which only includes rapes reported to law enforcement, and the U.S. Department of Justice's National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) which involves a survey of U.S. households and tallies offenses reported by victims age 12 and older. Both estimates are thought by many experts to be low. (1) Results of the NCVS released in December 1998 estimated 311,000 rapes and sexual assaults against victims over the age of 12 in the United States in 1997. (2) Results of the UCR indicated approximately 96,000 reported forcible rapes in 1997. (3)

  1. American Medical Association. 1997. Facts About Sexual Assault. Chicago, Illinois: American Medical Association.
  2. Michael Rand. 1998. Criminal Victimization 1997: Changes 1996-97 With Trends 1993-97. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Justice Statistics National Crime Victimization Survey, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice.
  3. Federal Bureau of Investigation. 1997. Uniform Crime Reports for the United States, 1997. Washington, D.C.: Federal Bureau of Investigation, US Department of Justice.

Reporting

Rape is called the most underreported violent crime in America.

Only 16% of rapes are ever reported to the police. In a survey of victims who did not report rape or attempted rape to the police, the following was found as to why no report was made: 43% thought nothing could be done, 27% felt it was a private matter, 12% were afraid of police response, and 12% felt it was not important enough.
Kilpatrick et al., 1992.

In the United States, a rape is reported every five minutes.
FBI Uniform Crime Report, 1997.

60% of the women who reported being raped were under 18 years old
29% were less than 11 years old
32% were between 11 and 17
22% were between 18 and 24
7% were between 25 and 29
6% were older than 29
3% age was not available
Rape in America: A Report to the Nation, National Victim Center, 1992.

Perpetrators
Only 2% of rapists are convicted and imprisoned.
U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee: Conviction and Imprisonment Statistics, 1993.